Greetings! The next Quelab general meeting is scheduled for Sunday 3 August 2014 at 4:30 PM.

Please bring something for the potluck at 4:30PM, and we’ll start the meeting at 5PM. If there is anything you would like to discuss at the meeting, bring it up to one of the officers, and we’ll put it on the agenda

 

Plot of calibrated delta bedI finally documented my analysis scripts to make calibrating a Delta 3D printer a bit more straightforward.
Not totally automated, but getting there.
With some of the new Marlin updates that allow setting some of these parameters in EEPROM instead of compiling them in,
this could be part of an automated procedure.

 

I found a really simple page to do digital filter designs. Ask me if you need some filters, and could use some help understanding the input parameters and outputs. It even generates C code to implement the filter for you!

 

On this date in 2010 We signed the lease on the first location that Quelab opened. We knew at the time it was not perfect, but with less than 7 people onboard we knew this was a community we needed to grow before we could even dream of perfect.

Quelab 1.0 was a quaint little place, a pretty old converted house (previous to us it was used as a flower shop), less than about 1200 sq foot of usable space (billed as 1400), it was quirky, But it let us have a space to “build it and see if the come”. It was not the dozens of people we hoped for but a small trickle. Our first tasks were building workbenches and some shelving, moving in some tables (most scrounged), chairs. By our grand opening party on August 12th (note that date Its when Quelab is going to observe its birthday this year with some Cake and Icecream with the members.) We had some bits of equipment, and we were just starting to make a name for ourselves.

Can’t say the next 4 years were easy, most of the time we were broke and being propped up on donations, and there were many times where we could have just closed the doors rather than digging deeper, We grew at a slow pace, and there was little chance we could reach out far and fast enough to survive on memberships alone. And none of us were good at grant writing, or experienced marketeers.

To survive we turned to what we knew, how to tinker with geeky things and thought we we should share that with the world. So we put on events, LED’s, Attraction, March of the Robots, Sound of the electron, Eco MAcGyver, Air&space, HauntedLab
Swapmeet’s, Steampunk Crafting, Hacking_Chocolate and more. We started hosting the Albuquerque Mini Maker Faire, and the Ignite Talks meetings, We setup booths at Tedxabq, Ace, and various other spaces. We have been toured by Caleb Kraft of Hackaday, we have won several Contests (Inventables, Instructables).

In November of 2013 after more than a year of hunting, Quelab was able to move to the grand Quelab 2.0 Campus we are in now. With over 340 people in attendance at our @nd grand opening (that is a huge increase over the 24 or so people who made it to our first one.) And a membership in excess of 50 members we are still on rocky waters but we have come a long-long way baby!

Thank you Albuquerque Makers, and supporters everywhere!

Happy Birthday Quelab!

 

Here is my drawing for a box to enclose a RAMPS1.4 stepper motor control board. If you don’t have any RAMPS1.4 boards… I guess you won’t be interested. You can cut these at Quelab from 3mm acrylic. Cut one copy as is, another copy without the little access holes for the opposing plates. It is easy to delete items in LaserCut, harder to add them.

You will need to add holes for fans, ventilation and cable routing.

 

In the most recent edition (Vol 40) of Make: Magazine, Quelab was listed as one of the “Most Interesting Makerspaces in America”, listed in the southwest section with folks like HeatSync Labs in Scotsdale, Arizona; LVL1 in Louisville, Kentuckuy; and the Dallas Makerspace in Dallas, Texas.


If you’re interested in purchasing a copy of the magazine which features Quelab, click on the magazine cover above to order it through our Amazon affilliate link. Or you can Subscribe to Make to keep getting intersting project ideas every few months. For selected back-issues of Make:, check out the Quelab Library!

Make Magazine, 2014 Most Interesting Makerspaces in America!

Congratulations to all the makers and hackers who make Quelab great, and whose projects make Quelab awesome! Keep making!

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Greetings! The next Quelab general meeting is scheduled for Sunday 6 July 2014 at 4:30 PM.

Please bring something for the potluck at 4:30PM, and we’ll start the meeting at 5PM. If there is anything you would like to discuss at the meeting, bring it up to one of the officers, and we’ll put it on the agenda

 

Coming July 12, at Quelab, in collaboration with ABQ Old School, we will be hosting another homebrewing class. Click on the link above, or the big homebrew bottles.

Beer. Mead. Cider. Each of these beverages have a number of things in common, but first and foremost: Yeast. This little microbe has so many tasty uses, we will gladly consume it’s bounty.

The other thing these libations have in common is the time-consuming process… and the delicious results. This lecture class (with demonstration) will discuss the history of beer, and then the finisher will be showing you the process on how YOU can make your own libations, and how you can use the insatiable appetite of yeast to your own purposes. Hooray Beer!


LEGAL DISCLAIMER: This class is 18+; NM Statute only restricts the manufacture of alcohol for sale, and the sale of alcohol to minors (21-). This generally is considered to mean that all adults can make alcohol in quantities suitable for personal consumption (aka ‘culinary purposes’).

Old School is a hub of experts happily sharing their user-friendly skills to further the revolution of sustainable and frugal living. Until now, these awesome resources in Albuquerque have had a loose network of independent workshops and classes. Now, these experts and offerings are under one roof, making Old School the place to find the skills you want to learn.

 

Part 1 of a continuing series…

 

If you’re a member of our Facebook group, you’ve probably already heard this, but we won a really neat tool!

 

It started with Mr. What (Aaron) emailing out to the members mailing list about the Inventables.com contest – they were giving away a Shapeoko 2 3D carving machine to a Maker Community in every state.

Shapeoko 2!

That message led to a back & forth flurry of others between members, officers & the board of directors, talking whether we should apply for it (honestly?  That was the easy no-brainer part!), and the best way to fill out the application.

 

We worked & worked, and edited & edited, down to the wire, and made the deadline to submit.  And we won for New Mexico!  Yay, Quelab!

 

That was last month.  Since then, Inventables contacted us with instructions how to actually get our hands on their magic machine.  Walter volunteered to be the point man, so it was delivered to his house.  I can’t imagine how excruciating is must have been to have that sealed box in his possession, yet not able to open it!  While everything is included, it comes as a kit, so there’s much work to be done in getting it all together & ready to cut.

Continue reading »

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Here in the Southwest, we are entering Year 5 of the drought, and there are more firework restrictions than ever. So once again I have compiled a few ideas/links from my own head and around the net. Share and enjoy!

No fire crackers?
Buy an extra long roll of bubblewrap (or collect it from places that get lots of things shipped), put it down on a sidewalk or driveway and have a little bubble walking parade!

Milk jug rockets Got old snap top milk jugs? How about making little rockets for the tops, and pouring a little baking soda in the bottom, pour in a few table spoons of vinegar and snap the cap on, and stand back. (experiment option alka-seltzer tablets can work too, which works better?

Family Firework time
Youtube videos and a data-projector outside on your garage door! If you live anywhere really dark (or inside)and don’t have a data-projector, you can project a monitor using a cardboard box and a magnifying lens (those flat fresnel lenses they sell at bookstores work great!
‘Jellyfish’ in a Bottle
Check out this YouTube video, which while not super fireworky, it’s a fun bottled show.
Bottle Lightshow
Spitballs, waterbeads, watergems; whatever you call those jelly spheres that they sell for putting in flower arrangements and as kids toys… Put them in a tall thin plastic bottle with a few glowsticks or cheap LED lights (Dollar Tree has flashing color LED bracelets), then toss it around in the dark. The spheres all work as little lenses and look at how it projects on a wall in the dark!
Paper Straw Rockets
No Bottle Rockets? How about Paper Straw Rockets? Breath-powered and fire-free fun.
Fireless Sparkler Decorations
Try these Pipe Cleaner ‘Sparklers’
LED Throwies
LED, Tape, Magnet, and a disposable lithium battery turn into Throwies; these will glow for up to 3 weeks and can be tossed against anything magnetic (garage doors often work great). You can also collect them and tossed them over and over again!
Pringles-can Kaleidoscope
Check out this link to get the plans. Substitute Transparency material with the shiny side inside folded and taped into triangular tube (instead of their cardboard and foil), and use a Phillips screwdriver to poke a hole in the middle of the bottom for an eyehole). I’d suggest cling wrap over the open end and then fill with beads and confetti, and snap the lid on.
Water Balloon Launchers
Follow these instructions to get a world-class water balloon catapult.
Confetti Popper
Get an air pocket in the corner of a ziploc bag, twist it off once and hold it in your hand. Sprinkle in some confetti in the upper part of the bag and zip it shut keeping as much air inside as possible. Hold above your head and quickly squeeze the air pocket — it should quickly untwist and then pop open the zip lock spraying confetti upwards!
Glowing Magical Mud
Needs cornstarch (or potatoes), Tonic water and a blacklight. Watch the YouTube video for the results.
Black Snakes
(no fire,  but fumes and dangerous chemicals). Uses Sulfuric acid (concentrated battery acid) and Powdered sugar. This experiment should be performed outside or in a fume-hood. In a glass beaker or other heat-safe Pyrex container. Put a 1/4 cup sugar in the bottom, pour in a little sulfuric acid until the sugar is completely covered, stir quickly, then just sit back and watch the reaction. The sugar will change from white to dark brown, then to black carbon.

For previous year’s ideas, check out:
Quelab’s Fireless Fourth Links from 2013
Quelab’s Fireless Fourth Links from 2011